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     Customs: Red & Green Channels

 

The Red and Green Channels system enables expeditious clearance of travellers at entry checkpoints; including

- Changi Airport

- Tuas Checkpoint

- Woodlands Checkpoint

- Woodlands Train Checkpoint

- Singapore Cruise Centre

- Tanah Merah Ferry Terminal

- Changi Ferry Teminal

If you are arriving by car at Tuas or Woodlands Checkpoint, you will see the Red and Green Channel directional signs located along the route after Immigration clearance. Travellers arriving by other modes will see the Red and Green Channel signs in the Arrival Hall.

When you arrive at the checkpoint, you are required to declare fully and correctly all dutiable, controlled or prohibited items that you are carrying.
All such goods and their import license or authorization where applicable, should be produced to the checkpoint officers at the entry point for examination. Making a false or an incorrect declaration is an offence under the law.

Red Channel

Source: Immigration & Checkpoints Authority

If you have any

  • Dutiable Goods
  • Controlled Goods
  • Prohibited Goods
you should seek Customs clearance at the Red Channel If in doubt, please also proceed to the Red Channel to make enquiries.

Green Channel

Source: Immigration & Checkpoints Authority

If you do not have any

  • Dutiable Goods
  • Controlled Goods
  • Prohibited Goods

you may choose the Green Channel.

Travellers found with the above goods at the Green Channel will be subject to enforcement action which may include fines or prosecution action.

Please Note: Your baggage may be examined by the checkpoint officers whether you take the RED or GREEN Channel.

Duty-Free Allowance
The import of dutiable goods is subject to the payment of duties and the Goods & Services Tax whilst the import of all other goods is subject only to the payment of the Goods & Services Tax. The dutiable items are intoxicating liquors, cigarettes and other tobacco products, motor vehicles including motor cycles/scooters and gasoline. You can find the complete list of dutiable goods and their tax rates at the Singapore Customs website at www.customs.gov.sg.

If you are 18 years and above, have arrived from countries other than Malaysia and have spent 48 hours and more outside Singapore immediately before your arrival, you may be granted the following duty-free allowance:

  • 1 litre of spirits (brandy, whisky, gin, rum, vodka, etc)
  • 1 litre of wine
  • 1 litre of beer

There is no duty-free allowance on cigarettes and other tobacco products.

GST Relief
Bona fide travellers, other than holders of a work permit, employment pass, student's pass, dependant's pass or long term pass, will be given Goods & Services Tax (GST) Relief on the following total value of new purchases, excluding liquors and tobacco:
Travellers away from Singapore for less than 24 hours:
18 years of age and above: S$50
Below 18 years of age: No relief
 
Travellers away from Singapore for 24 hours or more but less than 48 hours:
18 years of age and above: S$150
Below 18 years of age: S$50
 
Travellers away from Singapore for 48 hours or more:
18 years of age and above: S$300
Below 18 years of age: S$100

 

Important Notes
Please note that the GST/duty-free allowance is for your personal consumption. It is an offence to sell or give them away.

If you have goods exceeding your GST/duty-free allowance, the excess items can be brought in only on payment of the GST and duties.

GST and duties have to be paid on any goods that are imported for commercial, business or trade purposes.

 

Currency
There is no restriction on the amount of any currency that may be brought into or out of Singapore.

Controlled Goods
The items listed below require an import license or authorization from the relevant controlling authority for their entry into Singapore. This list is non-exhaustive on the controlled items permitted for import into Singapore. For more details please visit the respective websites below:
Item Controlling Authority
Animals, birds and their by-products
Plants
Endangered species of wildlife
Ornamental fish
Meat and meat products
Fish and seafood products
Fruits and vegetables
 
Agri-food and Veterinary Authority
 
Arms and explosives
Bullet-proof clothing
Toy guns, pistols and revolvers
Weapons, kris, spears and swords
 
Licensing Division Singapore Police Force
 
Pre-recorded cartridges and cassettes
Newspapers, books and magazines
Films, video tapes/discs, laser discs
CD-ROM and video games
 
Media Development Authority
 
Medicines
Pharmaceuticals
Poisons
 
Health Sciences Authority
 
Telecommunication and radio
communication equipments
Toy walkie-talkies
 
Infocomm Development Authority of Singapore

 

Important Notes
Please produce the import license or authorization from the relevant controlling authority when seeking entry for the controlled item. If you do not have the import license or authorization, checkpoint officers will retain the item and refer it to the relevant authority for approval. A Warehouse Deposit Receipt will be issued to you to claim the item from the authority concerned.

If you need to take medicines which may only be obtained through prescription under the Singapore laws, especially sleeping pills, depressants, stimulants, etc, please carry with you a prescription from a physician confirming that these medicines are required for your physical well-being.

There are severe penalties for the illegal possession of such medicines.

 

Prohibited Goods

Prohibited Liquors and Cigarettes
Intoxicating liquors and cigarettes marked with the words 'SINGAPORE DUTY NOT PAID' on the labels, cartons or packets are not allowed to be brought into Singapore. Cigarettes with the prefix 'E' printed on the packets are also not allowed to be brought into Singapore.

Other Prohibited Items:

  • Chewing gum
  • Chewing tobacco and imitation tobacco products
  • Cigarette lighters of pistol or revolver shape
  • Controlled drugs and psychotropic substances
  • Live dogs of the following breeds:

    Pit Bull (which includes the American Pit Bull Terrier also known as the American Pit Bull and Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier, Staffordshire Bull Terrier, the American Bulldog and crosses between them and with other breeds), Neapolitan Mastiff, Tosa, Akita, Dogo Argentino, Fila Braziliero and their crosses.

  • Firecrackers
  • Obscene articles, publications, video tapes/discs and software
  • Reproduction of copyright publications, video tapes, video compact discs, laser discs, records or cassettes
  • Seditious and treasonable materials

Source: Immigration & Checkpoints Authority

     Establishment of Singapore Customs

 

     NEWS SNIPPETS

     2004

Changes to Vehicle Entry Permit scheme for visitors from 6 Dec 2004

Reduction in VEP fees from S$30 to S$20 a day for foreign motorists driving foreign-registered cars into Singapore.
Reduction in the VEP operating hours on weekdays for the 6 December to 31 December 2004 period. The VEP will end at 12.00 noon instead of 7.00 pm.
Reduction in the fixed priced ERP charges from S$10 to S$5 a day, for visiting motorists who choose to use ERP-priced roads during ERP operating hours but do not have In-Vehicle Units (IUs) in their cars.
The normal toll charges for foreign-registered cars will still apply.

     - Changi Airport tests automated check-in & immigration system

     - Enhanced safety requirements for motorised bicycles & riders

     - Resumption of poultry & egg imports from Malacca & Johor

     - Update on Poultry & Egg Supply Situation in Singapore

 

Suspension of poultry imports from Malaysia

AVA has concurrently imposed a suspension on imports of poultry and poultry products from Malaysia with immediate effect (18 Aug 2004).

AVA would like to assure the public that poultry and poultry products in Singapore are safe for consumption.

     2003

     - Taxing cigarettes by stick from 1 July 2003

     2002

 

  The Customs & Excise Department has pumped in S$8.8 million for the installation of new equipment to boost border security. The equipment includes two high-tech gamma-ray scanners which allow officers to "see" the contents of cargo containers without opening them physically. The scanners will be used at Tanjong Pagar Gate, where 90 per cent of cargo containers pass through, and Pasir Panjang Terminal Gate. (Straits Times 29 Nov 2002) (H2)

  United States Customs officials will soon be deployed at ports here to help the authorities ensure that goods being shipped to the US are "clean". Singapore is the first country in Asia to adopt the new counter-terrorism security procedures under a Container Security Initiative proposed by US Customs in January. More than 50,000 containers arrive in the US daily from all over the world and Singapore reportedly ranks third after Hongkong and Shanghai in the volume of US-bound container traffic. (Straits Times 10 Jun 2002) (4)

  Last year, the Customs Department seized nearly 30 kg of drugs, including heroin, opium and Yaba tablets. This was nearly five times the amount seized the year before. Customs officers seized 13,343 kg of tobacco - the equivalent of over 66,700 cartons of cigarettes - compared to only 7,965 kg or about 39,825 cartons in 2000. The Customs Department has about 1,300 officers who belong to 13 branches. (Straits Times 21 Apr 2002)(1)

  Two new checkpoints for Customs, Immigration and Quarantine (CIQ) clearance have been set up at Clifford Pier and the West Coast Ferry Terminal. The facilities, which started operating on Monday, will enable customs officers to check and clear crew members and Singaporeans returning from ships anchored in Singapore waters. (Straits Times 19 Apr 2002) (H2)

     2001

  Nearly 12,400 people were caught last year trying to sneak cigarettes into Singapore without paying duty on them. In 1999, the Customs and Excise Department picked up about 9,500 such people. More than 90% of them tried to bring in one or two packets of cigarettes without paying tax. Mr LEE Kok Fatt, the department's head of public relations said that the quantity of cigarettes seized has dropped by almost half, from about 24,000 kg in 1999 to almost 13,800 kg in 2000. The government has been raising the tax on tobacco products gradually over the years. It was increased from S$130 per kg of tobacco to S$150 in February 2000 and to S$180 in February 2001. The latest rise in tobacco taxes means that consumers are paying S$3.60 in duty on every pack of 20 cigarettes they buy. This is 20% more than before. (Straits Times 20 Mar 2001)

     2000

  Applicants for an ordinary liquor licence can now go online, submit and post it on the Customs and Excise Department's website. The department's website, www.gov.sg/ customs, also accepts e-mail objections from parties opposed to the application. The new system came into effect on Monday 2 Oct 2000.